WHISKY RULE OF THE DAY:
The Whisky Rule is simple: If you cancel a meeting with less than 10 minutes notice, or if you miss it completely, then you owe your counterpart a bottle of whisky

I’ve been using the whisky rule for a couple of years. I’m generally pretty punctual and keep a close eye on my calendar, but from time to time I’ll slip up and completely forget a meeting or get stuck doing something else that I can’t get out of. In those situations I’m more than happy to sling a bottle of whisky to my counterpart as an apology and a sort of olive branch, hoping they’ll forgive me and we can make it up the next time we meet.


In NYC, a town where all my friends are flakes, this is finally some good news.
Via: lifehacker

WHISKY RULE OF THE DAY:

The Whisky Rule is simple: If you cancel a meeting with less than 10 minutes notice, or if you miss it completely, then you owe your counterpart a bottle of whisky

I’ve been using the whisky rule for a couple of years. I’m generally pretty punctual and keep a close eye on my calendar, but from time to time I’ll slip up and completely forget a meeting or get stuck doing something else that I can’t get out of. In those situations I’m more than happy to sling a bottle of whisky to my counterpart as an apology and a sort of olive branch, hoping they’ll forgive me and we can make it up the next time we meet.


In NYC, a town where all my friends are flakes, this is finally some good news.

Via: lifehacker

Rules for an Honorable Nightcap
By ROSIE SCHAAP

The only trouble with the otherwise honorable nightcap is that it has a diabolical way of turning into two or three, thus ceasing to be a nightcap at all but instead a formula for a rough morning. I’ve been down this road more than once, and it has taught me to regard the nightcap as a ritual performed to its greatest effect if I follow a few simple guidelines.
A nightcap should be a one-off, not “one more” of whatever you’re drinking. As much as I love a good cocktail, that’s how to start a night, not how to end it. Your last drink should be set apart, so pick something special, something to sip slowly; one serving of one spirit, neat. When possible, I like to make a separate space for my nightcap: if I’ve whiled away a few perfectly pleasant hours at one restaurant or bar, I’ll switch to another or drink that last one at home. A change of venue facilitates a change of pace and signals that the night is shifting down.     
A nightcap should also be brown. There are plenty of clear eaux de vie and other spirits that are said to settle the stomach after a luxurious repast. But a nightcap is different from an after-dinner drink or digestif. I stick with the classics: top-shelf whiskey, good brandy (usually Cognac), a burnished, potent, amber liqueur.
As a coda, a nightcap also shouldn’t stray too far from the movements that preceded it. It should bring them together and offer a fitting — not a dissonant — conclusion. If I’ve been drinking blended whiskey on the rocks, I’ll move up to a different expression of the same spirit, like a slow-sipping single malt (nothing too smoky for me; Aberlour 18 and Bruichladdich 15 are two favorites).     
If I’ve been drinking wine all night, a cognac hits the spot.      (Rémy Martin V.S.O.P. is easy to find and very satisfying.) It’s also derived from grapes and delivers a lingering, faintly ghostly winelike quality. When I crave something sweet, I go for my grandparents’ favorite: B&B, a mixture of Bénédictine (an herbal liqueur) and brandy. I also love Di Saronno Originale — complex and seductive and suggestive of almonds, though there are none in the formula.
Perhaps most important, a nightcap should be warming. I don’t see the appeal of a chilled or an on-the-rocks drink soon before sleep. A great part of the allure is that a whiskey or a brandy might feel as if it has lighted a little fire at the back of the throat. After the initial burn subsides, a soothing comfort remains, the liquor equivalent of a cup of hot milk. Just much better.
NIGHTCAP APPENDIX
     The Perfect Last-Drink Playlist
“Closing Time,” Tom Waits
“Cognac Blues,” Dizzy Gillespie
“Hemingway’s Whiskey,” Guy Clark
“In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning,” Frank Sinatra
“Last Call for Whiskey,” Choker Campbell & His Band
“Night Cap,” Charlie Parker
“One for My Baby,” Billie Holiday
“The Parting Glass,” the Pogues
“Straight, No Chaser,” Thelonious Monk
     Best Nightcap Scene in Cinematic History (‘The Graduate’)
Ben: I drove — I drove Mrs. Robinson home. She wanted me to drive her home so I — drove her home.
Mr. Robinson: Swell. I appreciate it.
Ben: She’s upstairs. She wanted me to wait down here till you got home.
Mr. Robinson: Standing guard over the old castle, are you?
Ben: Yes, sir.
Mr. Robinson: Here. Congratulations! It looks like you need a refill.
Ben: Oh no. I’ve got to go.
Mr. Robinson: Is anything wrong? You look a little shaken up.
Ben: Oh, no. No — I’m just — I’m just a little worried about my future. I’m a little upset about my future.
Mr. Robinson: Come on. Let’s have a nightcap together. Scotch?
Ben: Bourbon.
     Snifterology
Unlike most stemmed glasses, the rotund, low-slung snifter encourages you to hold the glass by the bowl rather than by the stem, allowing the warmth of your hand to help warm the brandy. Capacity is usually six to eight ounces, but don’t fill it up: just up to the curve, or about two ounces, will do the trick.


Submit to Whiskey Wednesday!

Rules for an Honorable Nightcap

The only trouble with the otherwise honorable nightcap is that it has a diabolical way of turning into two or three, thus ceasing to be a nightcap at all but instead a formula for a rough morning. I’ve been down this road more than once, and it has taught me to regard the nightcap as a ritual performed to its greatest effect if I follow a few simple guidelines.

A nightcap should be a one-off, not “one more” of whatever you’re drinking. As much as I love a good cocktail, that’s how to start a night, not how to end it. Your last drink should be set apart, so pick something special, something to sip slowly; one serving of one spirit, neat. When possible, I like to make a separate space for my nightcap: if I’ve whiled away a few perfectly pleasant hours at one restaurant or bar, I’ll switch to another or drink that last one at home. A change of venue facilitates a change of pace and signals that the night is shifting down.     

A nightcap should also be brown. There are plenty of clear eaux de vie and other spirits that are said to settle the stomach after a luxurious repast. But a nightcap is different from an after-dinner drink or digestif. I stick with the classics: top-shelf whiskey, good brandy (usually Cognac), a burnished, potent, amber liqueur.

As a coda, a nightcap also shouldn’t stray too far from the movements that preceded it. It should bring them together and offer a fitting — not a dissonant — conclusion. If I’ve been drinking blended whiskey on the rocks, I’ll move up to a different expression of the same spirit, like a slow-sipping single malt (nothing too smoky for me; Aberlour 18 and Bruichladdich 15 are two favorites).     

If I’ve been drinking wine all night, a cognac hits the spot.      (Rémy Martin V.S.O.P. is easy to find and very satisfying.) It’s also derived from grapes and delivers a lingering, faintly ghostly winelike quality. When I crave something sweet, I go for my grandparents’ favorite: B&B, a mixture of Bénédictine (an herbal liqueur) and brandy. I also love Di Saronno Originale — complex and seductive and suggestive of almonds, though there are none in the formula.

Perhaps most important, a nightcap should be warming. I don’t see the appeal of a chilled or an on-the-rocks drink soon before sleep. A great part of the allure is that a whiskey or a brandy might feel as if it has lighted a little fire at the back of the throat. After the initial burn subsides, a soothing comfort remains, the liquor equivalent of a cup of hot milk. Just much better.

NIGHTCAP APPENDIX

     The Perfect Last-Drink Playlist

“Closing Time,” Tom Waits

“Cognac Blues,” Dizzy Gillespie

“Hemingway’s Whiskey,” Guy Clark

“In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning,” Frank Sinatra

“Last Call for Whiskey,” Choker Campbell & His Band

“Night Cap,” Charlie Parker

“One for My Baby,” Billie Holiday

“The Parting Glass,” the Pogues

“Straight, No Chaser,” Thelonious Monk

     Best Nightcap Scene in Cinematic History (‘The Graduate’)

Ben: I drove — I drove Mrs. Robinson home. She wanted me to drive her home so I — drove her home.

Mr. Robinson: Swell. I appreciate it.

Ben: She’s upstairs. She wanted me to wait down here till you got home.

Mr. Robinson: Standing guard over the old castle, are you?

Ben: Yes, sir.

Mr. Robinson: Here. Congratulations! It looks like you need a refill.

Ben: Oh no. I’ve got to go.

Mr. Robinson: Is anything wrong? You look a little shaken up.

Ben: Oh, no. No — I’m just — I’m just a little worried about my future. I’m a little upset about my future.

Mr. Robinson: Come on. Let’s have a nightcap together. Scotch?

Ben: Bourbon.

     Snifterology

Unlike most stemmed glasses, the rotund, low-slung snifter encourages you to hold the glass by the bowl rather than by the stem, allowing the warmth of your hand to help warm the brandy. Capacity is usually six to eight ounces, but don’t fill it up: just up to the curve, or about two ounces, will do the trick.

Submit to Whiskey Wednesday!

WHISKEY FUNERAL OF THE DAY: Johnny Depp claims that when he dies he wants his remains placed in a whiskey cask for all of his mourners to drink from. 
I’m pretty sure thats the most bad ass way to get gastroenteritis. 

WHISKEY FUNERAL OF THE DAY: Johnny Depp claims that when he dies he wants his remains placed in a whiskey cask for all of his mourners to drink from. 

I’m pretty sure thats the most bad ass way to get gastroenteritis. 

HOW CAN YOU NOT LOVE THEIR PACKAGING?? 

HOW CAN YOU NOT LOVE THEIR PACKAGING?? 

KINGS COUNTY EVENT AT CHAR NO. 4 STARING NICOLE AUSTIN
Listen, to be fair I know nothing about whiskey, the reason I started this blog is because I want to know more about whiskey. I am an armature, but at least I’m a professional one at that. 
This is not the case for Ms. Austin who is an engineer/distiller for New York’s First distillery since prohibition (making them what they state the “oldest distillery in NYC” And even though they started in April 2010, they would be correct). Kings County started with making their very own moonshine from their apartment in Bushwick, Brooklyn and from there they now have branched out to make their own Bourbon as well.
Nicole gathered with other nerds like myself to talk about the steps on how to make moonshine. The chemisty and physics alone of it all made me regret sleeping through all of high school. If only I had known that chemistry would help me get drunk! 
Moonshine is just a slang term for “Corn Whiskey”. Its the foundation for bourbon, but what makes most moonshine turn into bourbon is just a newly charred barrel and a little bit of time. 
Here is what you need to know about Kings County moonshine:
Its is a mixture of mostly corn and barley. WARNING any corn whiskey that claims to be 100% corn whiskey can only be called that due to the extra chemicals they add to their mash. Corn needs to be broken down by enzimnes which is what barley is added to the mix. While corn has very little amount of enzimes, barley (especially barley that is made FOR the sole purpose of making whiskey) has an over amount of enzimes. Knowing this, when you see a label reading “100% corn whiskey” its because instead of using bailey they use chemicals to break down the corn mash. Better tasting? worse? that’s up to you to decide. 
Their organic corn comes from local farmers in the finger lake regions while their malted barley comes from experts in Scotland. Their barley is called “Golden Promise Barley” (sounds fancy, no?)
What they may lack in experience and history, the distillers of Kings County gain in love over their product. Nicole explained in great humor and modest fashion the mistakes they have made and the reason they make only 2.5 gallons of whiskey a day is not to seem snobbish and up the price but because they are working out of a 325-square foot room. 
If you can get your hands on some Kings County corn whiskey or bourbon I highly recommend it. If you can talk to any of the makers of this delish nip, I command you do so. They will enlighten you and get you drunk in the process. 
Also they gave us a free bottle of their Moonshine. AND YES I’M GOING TO GO CAMPING WITH IT.

KINGS COUNTY EVENT AT CHAR NO. 4 STARING NICOLE AUSTIN

Listen, to be fair I know nothing about whiskey, the reason I started this blog is because I want to know more about whiskey. I am an armature, but at least I’m a professional one at that. 

This is not the case for Ms. Austin who is an engineer/distiller for New York’s First distillery since prohibition (making them what they state the “oldest distillery in NYC” And even though they started in April 2010, they would be correct). Kings County started with making their very own moonshine from their apartment in Bushwick, Brooklyn and from there they now have branched out to make their own Bourbon as well.

Nicole gathered with other nerds like myself to talk about the steps on how to make moonshine. The chemisty and physics alone of it all made me regret sleeping through all of high school. If only I had known that chemistry would help me get drunk! 

Moonshine is just a slang term for “Corn Whiskey”. Its the foundation for bourbon, but what makes most moonshine turn into bourbon is just a newly charred barrel and a little bit of time. 

Here is what you need to know about Kings County moonshine:

  • Its is a mixture of mostly corn and barley. WARNING any corn whiskey that claims to be 100% corn whiskey can only be called that due to the extra chemicals they add to their mash. Corn needs to be broken down by enzimnes which is what barley is added to the mix. While corn has very little amount of enzimes, barley (especially barley that is made FOR the sole purpose of making whiskey) has an over amount of enzimes. Knowing this, when you see a label reading “100% corn whiskey” its because instead of using bailey they use chemicals to break down the corn mash. Better tasting? worse? that’s up to you to decide. 
  • Their organic corn comes from local farmers in the finger lake regions while their malted barley comes from experts in Scotland. Their barley is called “Golden Promise Barley” (sounds fancy, no?)

What they may lack in experience and history, the distillers of Kings County gain in love over their product. Nicole explained in great humor and modest fashion the mistakes they have made and the reason they make only 2.5 gallons of whiskey a day is not to seem snobbish and up the price but because they are working out of a 325-square foot room. 

If you can get your hands on some Kings County corn whiskey or bourbon I highly recommend it. If you can talk to any of the makers of this delish nip, I command you do so. They will enlighten you and get you drunk in the process. 

Also they gave us a free bottle of their Moonshine. AND YES I’M GOING TO GO CAMPING WITH IT.

Kings county tasting. Left is their corn whiskey, middle is a 100% corn whiskey with fake enzymes from a different distillery, right is their bourbon.

Kings county tasting. Left is their corn whiskey, middle is a 100% corn whiskey with fake enzymes from a different distillery, right is their bourbon.

Big event tonight at Brooklyn’s own Char No.4! Nicole Austin from Kings County Distillery will be here to talk about their process, answer questions and a tasting of their own nip. AND we will learn how to make our own moonshine!!! Hide your kids, hide wife.

Stay tuned for live blogging!

Big event tonight at Brooklyn’s own Char No.4! Nicole Austin from Kings County Distillery will be here to talk about their process, answer questions and a tasting of their own nip. AND we will learn how to make our own moonshine!!! Hide your kids, hide wife.

Stay tuned for live blogging!

Preach.
via 

Preach.

via 

asker

forestsongs asked: Hi there, Whiskey Wednesday! I know almost nothing about whiskey except that I like it. One of my friends had a bottle of Virginia Gentleman bourbon the other day, and I thought it was pretty good. Turns out it's also really cheap. Have you had this? What do you think of it? Is this actually good whiskey, or are my tastes to undeveloped to know how terrible it really is?

Dear forestsongs,

there is no such thing has “bad whiskey”. There is however, whiskey that you may like and dislike. 

I don’t know how much to stress this but DO NOT BE FOOLED BY THE WHISKEY SNOBS. Everyone likes different things, the more you taste whiskey, the more you realize what you like and dislike in each one. Just because its cheap doesn’t mean that its not good. Half the fun of drinking is trying something new and having a good time. Line a bunch of cheap whiskeys up and taste test them all. Whats different about the taste of Jim Beam to VG? What do you like or dislike about the two? Then try it with some thing more expensive, do you taste the difference? Does is matter? Cause hopefully you’re already feeling that buzz that we all love so so much.

Interesting fact about Virginia Gentleman, the original label was two white plantain owners being served whiskey by an african american slave. After starting a lot of controversy, V.G decided to change the label and the logo (the original read:  ”The Aristocrat of them All”)

asker

moderndayclassic asked: When I first joined tumblr I looked for a whiskey tumblr and couldn't find one....and now I have....I'm so happy!

Averagewhiteguy,

You happy, makes me happy! I’ll be updating more often as long as I know people out there are drinking and reading.

-Whiskey

(to ask more whiskey related questions, click the fuck out of me)